Colloquia Schedule Spring 2013

Colloquia are on Tuesdays (unless otherwise indicated) at 3:30 pm in RLM 15.216B

Jan 18
Fri
2 PM

"Probing the Physics of the Dark Universe with Galaxies"

abstract

Risa H. Wechsler

Stanford University

hosts: Shardha Jogee (Astronomy) & Linda Reichl (Physics)

Jan 22

"From Building Blocks to Large Galaxies: Towards Understanding the Formation of the Milky Way"

abstract

Anna Frebel

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

host: Volker Bromm

Jan 29

"High-redshift, Gravitationally Lensed Starburst Galaxies Revealed by the South Pole Telescope and ALMA"

abstract

Joaquin D. Vieira

California Institute of Technology (Caltech)

host: Neal Evans

Feb 5

"The Death of Massive Stars"

abstract

Christian D. Ott

California Institute of Technology (Caltech)

host: Milos Milosavljevic

Feb 12

Tinsley Scholar

"Asteroseismology with the Kepler Mission"

abstract

Gerald Handler

Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warsaw

hosts: Fritz Benedict, and Stars Research Group

Feb 19

"Three-Dimensional Simulations of Core-Collapse Supernovae"

Core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the luminous explosions that herald the death of massive stars. Neutron stars, pulsars, magnetars, and stellar-mass black holes are all born out of these explosions. Some Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been associated with CCSNe, raising the possibility of a common progenitor for both. CCSNe are chiefly responsible for the production of elements heavier than iron throughout the universe; their importance in galactic chemical evolution cannot be underestimated. The first stars, expected to be relatively massive, likely ended as CCSNe as well. These bright events, occurring just a couple million years after the Big Bang, may be some of the most distant, observable objects in the universe with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Despite the importance of CCSNe to our understanding of many aspects of the universe the mechanism that reverses stellar core collapse and drives supernova explosions is not fully understood. The CCSN mechanism is one of the most important challenges for modern computational astrophysics. I will discuss the current state-of-the-art of CCSN theory and simulation, with an emphasis on my recent work on three-dimensional CCSN simulations. I will highlight some of the most interesting and important questions supernova theorists are currently wrestling with, in particular the importance of fully three-dimensional simulations.

close

Sean Couch

University of Chicago

host: Milos Milosavljevic & Craig Wheeler

Feb 26

"The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE)"

abstract

Jack O. Burns

University of Colorado, Boulder

host: Craig Wheeler

Mar 5

"Feedback in Faint Galaxies During the Peak Epoch of Star Formation"

abstract

Dawn Erb

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

host: Steve Finkelstein

Mar 12

Spring Break: no talks or classes scheduled this week (March 11-15).

Mar 19

Tinsley Scholar

"Reionization History and Physical Processes Indicated from the Census of Galaxies at z~>7"

abstract

Masami Ouchi

University of Tokyo, ICRR

hosts: Roderik Overzier & UT Astronomy Galaxies Research Group

Mar 26

"Dark Matter in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies"

abstract

Anatoly Klypin

New Mexico State University

host: John Kormendy

Apr 1
Monday
3:00 pm

PhD Defense Presentation

"Theoretical Studies of Superluminous Supernovae"

abstract

Emmanouil "Manos" Chatzopoulos

University of Texas at Austin

Apr 2

"Galaxy Star Formation Efficiency from z = 0 to z = 8"

abstract

Peter Behroozi

Stanford University

host: Shardha Jogee

Apr 9

"Bayesian Success Stories in Astronomy"

abstract

James Scott

University of Texas at Austin, Dept. of Information, Risk, and Operations Management, Red McCombs School of Business

host: Daniel Jaffe

Apr 16

"New Clues on the Origin of the Astrophysical r-Process"

abstract

Richard Boyd

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/National Ignition Facility

host: Chris Sneden

Apr 19
Friday
Noon

PhD Defense Presentation

"Metallicities of Anomalous-Velocity Gas in the Vicinity of the Milky Way"

abstract

John Barentine

University of Texas at Austin

Apr 23

"The WISP Survey: Overview of Recent Results for Galaxies in the 1 < z < 2 Redshift Range"

abstract

Claudia Scarlata

University of Minnesota

host: Steve Finkelstein

Apr 30

Tinsley Scholar

"YSOVAR: Mid-Infrared Variations in Young Stars"

abstract

Luisa M. Rebull

California Institute of Technology

host: Joel Green & UT Astronomy Interstellar Research Group

May 7

"Repeating Novae and the Origin of SN Ia Events"

abstract

George Wallerstein

University of Washington

host: Harriet Dinerstein

Visitors to the Department of Astronomy can find detailed information and maps on our Visiting Austin Page.

Please report omissions/corrections to: G. Orris at argus@astro.as.utexas.edu.

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