Dr. Jeffrey M. Silverman's
UT Austin Astronomy Website

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Dr. Jeffrey M. Silverman        The University of Texas at Austin
NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow                                Department of Astronomy, RLM 17.214
510-402-8635 (cell)        2515 Speedway, Stop C1400
512-471-6016 (fax)        Austin, Texas 78712-1205

This is my UT Austin website. It is (relatively) lame.

(Less so, or as lame as, previous versions, however.)

I try to keep my CV and Resume up to date, but you never know...


Here is the SuperNovae DataBase (SNDB) that I put together as part of my PhD Thesis at UC Berkeley
(along with the help of a few undergraduates).
The SNDB uses the popular open-source software stack known as LAMP:
the Linux operating system, the Apache web server, the MySQL relational database management system,
and the PHP server-side scripting language. I have also implemented instances of a few PHP helper classes.
See this paper for more information regarding the SNDB.


Here is the full version of a lecture on my research and here is an abridged (and poorly lit) version.
Here is the actual presentation for the full version above.

Here is my interview on the UT Austin radio station KVRX (91.7)
from "They Blinded Me With Science," a weekly show on science news and current events.

Here is my award winning interview from April 2008 on the UC Berkeley radio station KALX (90.7)
from "The Graduates," a radio show dedicated to graduate student research at UC Berkeley.

My headshot, circa May 2012.

This is my standard headshot, circa May 2012.



A cool picture of M100.

This is a cool picture I took of M100 (a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way)
in February 2007, using the Keck Telescope (one of the largest optical telescopes in the world)
on the Big Island of Hawaii.
It's by far the coolest astronomy picture that I've ever taken.

A cool picture of the moon.

This is a cool picture I took of part of the moon in May 2002,
using the Brazos Bend State Park observatory just outside Houston, TX.
It's the second coolest astronomy picture that I've taken to date.



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Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.