New Horizons in Astronomy

Schedule

Sunday, October 6

6:30 pm

Reception (Dinner and Drinks), Hula Hut

Monday, October 7 - Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302 [map]

8:30 am

Coffee & Tea

9:00

Welcome :: Sarah Tuttle

9:30

The Cosmic Microwave Background: An Experimentalists's Guide to CMB Measurements and Prospects for the Future

Laura Newburgh, Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto

abstract

10:15

Coffee Break

10:45

Numerical Simulations of the Dark Universe

Raul Angulo, Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon

abstract

11:30

Simulating Galaxy Structure within LCDM

Laura Sales, ITC, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA

abstract

12:15

1 minute poster summaries

12:30

Lunch/Mtgs/Breaks

2:15

The Structure of the Milky Way

Jo Bovy, Institute for Advanced Study

abstract

3:00

Coffee Break

3:30

The Formation of Massive Stars and Star Clusters in the Milky Way

Cara Battersby, University of Colorado, Boulder

abstract

4:15

Star Formation: Chemistry as a Probe of Embedded Protostars

Ruud Visser, University of Michigan

abstract


6:30 pm

Dinner w/ UT Speaker David Stuart, Hilton Garden Inn

Special Presentation

Astronomy and Cosmology among the Ancient Maya

abstract

Tuesday, October 8 - Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302 [map]

8:30 am

Coffee & Tea

9:00

The Surprisingly Complex Lives of Massive Galaxies

Rachel Bezanson, University of Arizona

abstract

9:30

Black Hole Safari: Tracking Populations and Hunting Big Game

Nicholas McConnell, IfA, University of Hawaii

Understanding the physical connection, or lack thereof, between the growth of galaxies and supermassive black holes is a key challenge in extragalactic astronomy. Dynamical studies of nearby galaxies (~ 1-100 Mpc) are building a census of black hole masses across a broad range of galaxy types and uncovering statistical correlations between galaxy bulge properties and black hole masses. These local correlations provide a baseline for studying galaxies and black holes at higher redshifts. In the past few years, new measurements have probed the extremes of the supermassive black hole population and introduced surprises that challenge simple models of black hole and galaxy co-evolution. The most massive black holes known are ~ 10^10 M_Sun, born from gluttonous accretion in the early universe. A representative sample of their present-day host galaxies would reflect the aftermath of their precocious youth and help determine the influences of cosmic environment versus local accretion and feedback. The hunt for enormous quiescent black holes is underway, but detecting their gravitational signatures in massive (or not so massive) galaxies is uniquely challenging. Several objects measured thus far suggest that black hole and galaxy growth lead to diverse outcomes.

close

10:15

Coffee Break

10:45

The Progenitor Systems and Explosion Mechanisms of Supernovae

Dan Milisavljevic, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA

abstract

11:30

Reverberation Mapping: Masses and Distance and Size, Oh My!

Kelly Denney, Ohio State University

abstract

12:15

Lunch/Mtgs/Breaks

2:00

Magnetic Fields in Astrophysics: From Earth to the Intercluster Medium

Michael Pavel, University of Texas at Austin

abstract

2:45

More Than a Star, or How Does Solar Activity Impact The Heliosphere?

Kamen Kozarev, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO)

abstract

3:30

Coffee Break

4:00

In Search of Exomoons

David Kipping, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA

abstract

4:45

Planet Formation: Knowing the Progenitors and the Progeny

Kaitlin Kratter, University of Colorado, Boulder

abstract