New Horizons in Astronomy

Schedule

Sunday, October 6

6:30 pm

Reception (Dinner and Drinks), Hula Hut

Monday, October 7 - Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302 [map]

8:30 am

Coffee & Tea

9:00

Welcome :: Sarah Tuttle

9:30

The Cosmic Microwave Background: An Experimentalists's Guide to CMB Measurements and Prospects for the Future

Laura Newburgh, Dunlap Institute, University of Toronto

abstract

10:15

Coffee Break

10:45

Numerical Simulations of the Dark Universe

Raul Angulo, Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon

abstract

11:30

Simulating Galaxy Structure within LCDM

Laura Sales, ITC, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA

abstract

12:15

1 minute poster summaries

12:30

Lunch/Mtgs/Breaks

2:15

The Structure of the Milky Way

Jo Bovy, Institute for Advanced Study

abstract

3:00

Coffee Break

3:30

The Formation of Massive Stars and Star Clusters in the Milky Way

Cara Battersby, University of Colorado, Boulder

abstract

4:15

Star Formation: Chemistry as a Probe of Embedded Protostars

Ruud Visser, University of Michigan

abstract


6:30 pm

Dinner w/ UT Speaker David Stuart, Hilton Garden Inn

Special Presentation

Astronomy and Cosmology among the Ancient Maya

abstract

Tuesday, October 8 - Avaya Auditorium, POB 2.302 [map]

8:30 am

Coffee & Tea

9:00

The Surprisingly Complex Lives of Massive Galaxies

Rachel Bezanson, University of Arizona

abstract

9:30

Black Hole Safari: Tracking Populations and Hunting Big Game

Nicholas McConnell, IfA, University of Hawaii

abstract

10:15

Coffee Break

10:45

The Progenitor Systems and Explosion Mechanisms of Supernovae

Dan Milisavljevic, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA

abstract

11:30

Reverberation Mapping: Masses and Distance and Size, Oh My!

Kelly Denney, Ohio State University

abstract

12:15

Lunch/Mtgs/Breaks

2:00

Magnetic Fields in Astrophysics: From Earth to the Intercluster Medium

Michael Pavel, University of Texas at Austin

abstract

2:45

More Than a Star, or How Does Solar Activity Impact The Heliosphere?

Kamen Kozarev, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO)

abstract

3:30

Coffee Break

4:00

In Search of Exomoons

David Kipping, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA

Two decades ago, astronomers began detecting planets orbiting stars other than our Sun, so-called exoplanets. Since that time, the volume of detections and the sensitivity to ever-smaller planets has improved dramatically with several Earth-size/mass planets now known. As our sensitivity dives into the terrestrial regime, increasingly the community has wondered if the moons of exoplanets may also be detectable, so-called exomoons. Their detection represents an outstanding challenge in modern astronomy and would provide deep insights into the uniqueness of our Solar System and perhaps even expand the definition of habitability. In this talk, I will briefly review theoretical work exploring the formation and evolution of exomoons to guide observational searches, with particular attention to potentially habitable exomoons. Next, I’ll outline the different methods which have been proposed to accomplish this challenging feat and their respective merits. Finally, initial results from observational efforts will be summarized with a view to future prospects as well.

close

4:45

Planet Formation: Knowing the Progenitors and the Progeny

Kaitlin Kratter, University of Colorado, Boulder

abstract